Blooma Childbirth Education Classes

Labor Of Love

In life, we are often convinced to doubt ourselves. So, it is no wonder that we find it hard to believe that we have everything we need to bring our babies Earthside. Babies have been entering into this world, through the gates of their mother’s souls, since the beginning of time. Regardless of how births unfold, they do. Babies arrive in their mother’s arms; their father’s arms; into the arms of those that love and care for them deeply.

The truth is, we are innately born with the ability to start labor, move through labor, and give birth. As humans, we are built to become deeply connected to one another. Though much of what we witness in our world today doesn’t always prove this to be true, love is at the heart of our existence. The science of it all boils down to one simple fact: the flow of hormones in our bodies drives these finely-tuned, innate processes.

As a DONA-trained birth and postpartum doula, a LAMAZE-certified childbirth educator, and a prenatal/postpartum yoga instructor, I often get asked:

“How can I best encourage, enhance and support the natural, pulsating rhythms of labor?”

I hear this question from the doting father-to-be who arrives at the Couple’s Birthing Intensive with a desire to learn how to be the best he can be in supporting his wife as they welcome their child into the world.

I hear this question from the loving partner, in awe of her wife's changing body. A partner who wants to give support while showing acknowledgement and love for this commitment to their growing family.

I hear this question from the “new doula” who just finished her formal training and is dripping with excitement to support her first family in their sacred birth experience.

I hear this question from the woman who will be by her sister’s side while she molds and grows     and forms into the new role of “mother”.

I hear this question from expecting mothers who carve out time to show up on their yoga mat for prenatal yoga. Connect with her baby, but most importantly, connecting to her hopes and desires for her impending birth.

All of these questions stem from a place of acknowledgment and recognition that the anticipation of birth can be overwhelmingly significant. It can stop us dead in our tracks. It can bring up fears and hesitations that were once long buried. It can evoke unwelcome vulnerability and uncertainties. It can open up our self-doubt unlike any other. Expectant woman or not, these sentiments are often felt in varying degrees from everyone involved in the witnessing of such a significant life transition.

Regardless of who is asking the question “how can I best encourage, enhance and support the natural, pulsating rhythms of labor” my answer is always this:

whenever possible, create an environment conducive to building oxytocin”.

Ah yes…Oxytocin.

You may have heard of it. And chances are, whether you know it or not, you’re strongly familiar with it.

Oxytocin is the hormone of love. It is the hormone of a comforting embrace; of a shared kiss; of a deep belly laugh; of a late night cuddle; of intimate sex; of the welcomed touch from a loving hand; of a gifted smile. Simply put, it is the hormone that sky-rockets when we make a connection with another human being. This super-star hormone is also the one in the driver’s seat during labor and birth.

Lamaze International states that “one of the most powerful ways we can support the normal physiology of labor and birth is to let labor begin on its own…the most compelling reason {for this} may be to allow the birth hormones to regulate labor and birth as nature intends.” By doing this, we are allowing the woman’s body to respond, hormonally, in a way that signals to her body and baby that “it’s time.” From this moment on, environmental factors have an impact on the laboring mother.

Women’s bodies are magnificent works of art and function. When trusted and given the opportunity, our bodies - capable & powerful - can do much more than expected. The rush of hormones - of oxytocin - can contract the uterus, can bond two humans together, and can even block the rest of the world out, if even for a moment.

While the body is capable of blocking out it’s surroundings, external and environmental factors can still play a role in the ability of women’s bodies to do their biggest life’s work. Much like the laboring animal retreats into its den for safety; laboring women also need a safe birthing space that enables the sacredness of the journey to unfold.

This may sound like an overwhelming task — creating an environment conducive to the manifestation of oxytocin — but it’s simple really. Laboring women need an environment where they feel love.

When an expectant woman’s partner looks me in the eyes with anxious nervousness and asks me, with quiet hesitation, “how can I possibly be what she needs in birth?”, I look at them confidently and tell them, “You already are.”

*All Photos by Danica Donnelly

Written By Sarah Bach-Bergs-Blooma Yoga Instructor, LAMAZE-Certified Childbirth Educator, DONA-Trained Birth and Postpartum Doula, Mama of two crazy boys, wife, friend, and wilderness lover.

You can learn more from Sarah at Blooma's Couples Birthing Intensive on October 29th, November 19th & December 10th

What is Spinning Babies Parent Class?

Spinning Babies is a technique made famous by Gail Tully. It is an approach based on easing baby’s rotation - when rotation is easier for baby, birth is often easier for mother. We are so excited the Blooma is the FIRST organization to offer The Spinning Babies Parent Class with our trained Childbirth Educators.

What is Spinning Babies?

Spinning Babies looks at birth from a physiological perspective - birth is seen as a natural and normal occurrence for the body with mamas using their own powers to allow labor to start on its own. The Spinning Babies approach investigates baby’s role in labor.  We know that baby's position plays an strong role in the process and progress of birth.  By knowing fetal position, and the space available in the womb, less force and medical intervention is warranted.   

Why should I take the Spinning Babies Parent Class?

Spinning Babies Parent Class is a great opportunity to better understand how baby is an active participant in labor. You will learn how to maintain balance in your body prior to labor, helping to create ease and even pleasure during your birth.  This hands-on class allows you and your partner to practice comfort techniques and daily exercises with ample time to ask questions.

How will Spinning Babies Parent Class impact my birth?

Learning the material and techniques in the Spinning babies Parent Class will instill confidence in your body’s ability to birth your baby. As Gail Tully says, “Not too tight, not too loose, not too twisty.”  Some of our daily habits (i.e. sitting for long periods of time, placing more weight on one leg versus another when standing/leaning, long commutes to work) can create imbalances in the body. The Spinning Babies Parent Class teaches techniques to help bring more symmetry to the tensions/looseness of your muscles, ligaments, and joints. This can help baby navigate the pelvis and surrounding tissues more easily.  This knowledge will help alleviate fears of the birth process and leave you feeling empowered and excited as your little one’s guess date approaches.  

Interested to learn more? Sign up for an upcoming Spinning Babies Parent Class!

October 4 at the Minnesota Birth Center in St. Paul

November 17 in Minneapolis

If you have any questions about this class, or the Spinning Babies technique, please reach out to our educators at education@blooma.com.

Written by Amy Kelley, a M,ama, Doula, Childbirth Educator, Prenatal Yoga Instructor, Kids, Toddler, & Byob Yoga Instructor.  You can find me on Instagram as @amykelleydoula or visit my website at www.amynkelley.com

 

Ask the Educators - Let's talk about VBACs

Childbirth education at Blooma serves families no matter what type of birth they are planning. All classes present evidence-based information for normal and safe birth, influenced by the Lamaze 6 Healthy Birth Practices. Classes provide information to expectant families to reduce their fear or anxiety while building confidence and preparing them for birth.

Each Blooma Educator is a seasoned birth doula, up to date on birthing practices and policies.

Our educators frequently hear the same concerns about pregnancy, birth, and beyond. We love hearing your questions, and helping you make informed decisions for your birth. We often hear questions about VBACs (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean), so we wanted to take the time to answer your questions and provide information for you and your family.

I had a cesarean birth. Will I be able to have a vaginal birth this time?

The short answer is yes, most likely! In the US, 74% of women who attempt VBACs are successful.[1] Previously, The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommended a TOLAC, or Trial of Labor After Cesarean, for women with one previous cesarean and a low-transverse incision. In 2010, they updated their guidelines so that “…women with two previous low-transverse cesarean incisions, women carrying twins, and women with an unknown type of uterine scar are considered appropriate candidates for a TOLAC," according to Jeffrey L. Ecker, MD, co-author of the guidelines.[2]

 What can I do to prepare for a VBAC?

Choose your provider and place of birth carefully. Research VBAC success rates for both the practice and the location. Hire a doula who has experience in supporting VBACs. Blooma offers a VBAC class to help answer questions, explore the pros and cons, and more!

What if I decide I want a repeat cesarean or end up needing one?

Know that a repeat cesarean is still a valid choice. Many women have so much fear after what happened the first time that a repeat cesarean feels like the safer emotional choice. There are also certain medical conditions that make a planned cesarean a safer option. If you do go the route of planned cesarean, be sure to find a provider who is willing to accommodate a family-centered cesarean. A family-centered cesarean includes things like:

  • Using a clear drape or lowering the drape when the baby is born
  • Delayed cord clamping
  • Skin-to-Skin in the OR
  • Mom and baby stay together in recovery
  • Doulas and partners allowed in the OR

The Blooma Childbirth Educators are a great resource for VBAC-friendly providers, doctors who practice using family-centered cesareans, doulas with experience supporting VBACs, and additional reading on this topic. Join us for an upcoming Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Class, led by Mari Melby, April 7 in Minneapolis.

Mari Melby is a doula and childbirth educator at Blooma. You can read more from her on her website, www.marimelby.com.

 

[1]Cunningham FG, Bangdiwala S, Brown SS, Dean TM, Frederiksen

M, Rowland Hogue CJ, King T, Spencer Lukacz E, McCullough LB, Nicholson W, Petit N, Probstfield JL, Viguera AC, Wong CA, Zimmet SC. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement: Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights. March 8—10, 2010. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2010; 115(6):1279–1295.

[2]American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Communications. Ob Gyns Issue Less Restrictive VBAC Guidelines. ACOG. N.p., 21 July 2010. Web. 6 June 2017.