Ask the Educators - Let's talk about VBACs

Childbirth education at Blooma serves families no matter what type of birth they are planning. All classes present evidence-based information for normal and safe birth, influenced by the Lamaze 6 Healthy Birth Practices. Classes provide information to expectant families to reduce their fear or anxiety while building confidence and preparing them for birth.

Each Blooma Educator is a seasoned birth doula, up to date on birthing practices and policies.

Our educators frequently hear the same concerns about pregnancy, birth, and beyond. We love hearing your questions, and helping you make informed decisions for your birth. We often hear questions about VBACs (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean), so we wanted to take the time to answer your questions and provide information for you and your family.

I had a cesarean birth. Will I be able to have a vaginal birth this time?

The short answer is yes, most likely! In the US, 74% of women who attempt VBACs are successful.[1] Previously, The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommended a TOLAC, or Trial of Labor After Cesarean, for women with one previous cesarean and a low-transverse incision. In 2010, they updated their guidelines so that “…women with two previous low-transverse cesarean incisions, women carrying twins, and women with an unknown type of uterine scar are considered appropriate candidates for a TOLAC," according to Jeffrey L. Ecker, MD, co-author of the guidelines.[2]

 What can I do to prepare for a VBAC?

Choose your provider and place of birth carefully. Research VBAC success rates for both the practice and the location. Hire a doula who has experience in supporting VBACs. Blooma offers a VBAC class to help answer questions, explore the pros and cons, and more!

What if I decide I want a repeat cesarean or end up needing one?

Know that a repeat cesarean is still a valid choice. Many women have so much fear after what happened the first time that a repeat cesarean feels like the safer emotional choice. There are also certain medical conditions that make a planned cesarean a safer option. If you do go the route of planned cesarean, be sure to find a provider who is willing to accommodate a family-centered cesarean. A family-centered cesarean includes things like:

  • Using a clear drape or lowering the drape when the baby is born
  • Delayed cord clamping
  • Skin-to-Skin in the OR
  • Mom and baby stay together in recovery
  • Doulas and partners allowed in the OR

The Blooma Childbirth Educators are a great resource for VBAC-friendly providers, doctors who practice using family-centered cesareans, doulas with experience supporting VBACs, and additional reading on this topic. Join us for an upcoming Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Class, led by Mari Melby, April 7 in Minneapolis.

Mari Melby is a doula and childbirth educator at Blooma. You can read more from her on her website, www.marimelby.com.

 

[1]Cunningham FG, Bangdiwala S, Brown SS, Dean TM, Frederiksen

M, Rowland Hogue CJ, King T, Spencer Lukacz E, McCullough LB, Nicholson W, Petit N, Probstfield JL, Viguera AC, Wong CA, Zimmet SC. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement: Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights. March 8—10, 2010. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2010; 115(6):1279–1295.

[2]American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Communications. Ob Gyns Issue Less Restrictive VBAC Guidelines. ACOG. N.p., 21 July 2010. Web. 6 June 2017.